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Carolina Creative Campus – The Gender Project » Women in Journalism

Carolina Creative Campus – The Gender Project

Women in Journalism

Hello everybody.

My name is Will. I’m an English major with minors in creative writing and news-editorial journalism, and I’m excited to have the chance to contribute to Carolina’s Gender Project. I’ve worked on various desks at The Daily Tar Heel for the past several years. I spent the spring and summer studying in the British Isles, and I met Reed after contributing an article to the Carolina Performing Arts program book about an upcoming Memorial Hall show by the Druid Theater Company from Galway, Ireland.

In my features writing class Thursday morning, we had the opportunity to talk to Karen Jurgensen, editor for USA Today for several years, about what it was like to put together a news edition in the hours following the September 11 attacks. (She said USA Today had to scrap almost the entire design for the day; the new edition sold more than three million copies.) In 1999, Jurgensen made headlines when she became the first woman to be appointed head of a national paper. Most sources on the Web will tell you she started her career in a paper in Charlotte, N.C., but it actually goes back all the way to The Daily Tar Heel. She was an English major, which makes me feel decidedly better about my own career prospects.

Talking to her got me to thinking about a larger conversation that has been going on in the world of journalism for some time: the continued domination of the workplace by male writers. According to a statistic from one of the articles below (click the second link), women occupy just three percent of “clout” decision-making positions. The ratio of men to women in op-ed positions is also drastically unbalanced, although a few women have become household names in that sector – Cynthia Tucker at The Atlanta Journal-Constitution and Maureen Dowd at The New York Times come to mind.

There’s been many a good article written about this problem in the industry, and I’ve posted two of them below. Take a look if you’re interested in some further reading.

Stop the Presses, Boys! Women Claim Space on Op-Ed Pages
By PATRICIA COHEN
March 15, 2007

Catherine Orenstein, an author and occasional op-ed page contributor herself, teaches a seminar on how to write and publish an op-ed essay. At the time of the article, hundreds of women and also men (In fewer numbers) had taken the seminar, and Orenstein had received clips of published essays from about two dozen of her former students.

Voices too often missing in op-ed land: women’s
By CAROL JENKINS
July 16, 2008

Among the parties at fault for the scarcity of women op-ed writers, writes Jenkins, editors share in the blame — but it’s also up to women to participate more assertively.

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